Military Industrial Complex

Kim talks to Patrick Deer about the Military Industrial Complex, a term used by US President Dwight D. Eisenhower in a 1961 speech to describe a permanent war economy, and the political, economic, and cultural matrix that sustains it. References are made to James Ledbetter’s book Unwarranted Influence and Seymour Melman’s book The Permanent War Economy.

Patrick Deer is Associate Professor at the Department of English, New York University. He focuses on war culture and war literature, modernism, and contemporary British and American literature and culture, and Anglophone literature and human rights. His book Culture in Camouflage explores the emergence of modern war culture in the first half of the 20th century. 

Image: Scene from the film Doctor Strangelove

Music used in promotional material: “Grim Desert Aftermath” by Kevin Bryce.

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Dissensus

Kim talks with Gina about Jacques Rancière’s concept of dissensus.

Gina refers to several major works of philosophy including:
Jacques Rancière’s Dissensus
Immanuel Kant’s Critique of Judgement
Jacques Derrida’s The Truth In Painting
Plato’s Republic
She also takes a small dig at Althusser, in the spirit of Rancière

Gina is a PhD candidate at NYU and an amazing teacher. She studies medieval literature and critical theory. She loves Theodor Adorno and really really hates the dialectic.

This week’s image is an illuminated miniature from a 15th C manuscript held by the British Museum, depicting the “Debate for the Soul.”

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Decolonization

Kim speaks with Jini Kim Watson about decolonization.

In the episode she quotes John Kelly and Martha Kaplan’s book Represented Communities: Fiji and World Decolonization, University of Chicago Press, 2001. She also references Odd Arne Westad’s book The Global Cold War: Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times, Cambridge UP: 2005; Ngũgĩ Wa Thiong’o, Decolonising the Mind: The Politics of Language in African Culture, Currey, 1986; Lorenzo Veracini’s work on settler colonialism and decolonization; and Patrick Wolfe’s argument that invasion and colonialism is not an event, but a structure.

To learn more about the “opening” at the moment of decolonization after WW2; she suggests you consult Gary Wilder, Freedom Time: Negritude, Decolonization, and the Future of the World, Duke UP, 2015.

Jini teaches in the English Department at NYU. Her book on decolonization in the Cold War, Cold War Reckonings: Authoritarianism and the Genres of Decolonization is forthcoming from Fordham University Press.

This week’s image is a 1942 proposed map for a New World Order.

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